THE ACHACACHI POSTOnline News

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

Morales proposed the G77 + China achieve a just world

G77 + CHINA MEETING • Bolivian President Evo Morales proposed the G77 + China start walking towards a just world where humans and nature live twinned.

By EUGEN ROXAS / The Achacachi Post



President Evo Morales and UN General Secretary Ban Ki -mon. Photo © ABI
NEW YORK, USA.— Morales, In his speech, invited member countries to feed ' the ancient wisdom of indigenous and native peoples ' . He said he came to this forum to share the experience of his work in Bolivia, thinking about the unity of the people and reduce poverty.
"We have a responsibility to seek equality of our people always thinking the most abandoned. I come to share some values for the good of all mankind. All for the universal brotherhood of peoples in harmony with Mother Earth" he said.
In his view, countries must present a structural change, a transformation of the structures. That is the challenge of the new history that we have to write, which cannot be other than the history of life ' , sustained .

Morales said that the capitalist system faces its crisis: financial, energetic, climate, food. He said that for capitalism Mother Earth and the people are objects to be dominated.

"We live in a crisis for the prescriptions of the International Monetary Fund ( IMF) , World Bank (WB) that told us to privatize."
However,
"The south has a growing economy, considerable wealth in natural resources, and a great diversity of peoples. In this context, the G77 + China are one of the main actors of change in this historic moment. "

"I cannot understand how powerful groups have criminalized the chewing of the coca leaves. It is one of the food and medicine of the ancient people. The same happened with quinoa before despised by capitalism to be Indian food, now it has become a real alternative for good nutrition of everyone".

Finishing his speech, Morales called on the United Nations and members of the G77 + China hold a summit in Bolivia, on June 15 of this year, to celebrate in the eastern city of Santa Cruz the 50 years of this multilateral agency.

The G -77 + China were founded on June 15, 1964. This multilateral agency carries a critical view of capitalism. Initially were 77 countries, over the years, other states were annexed. Currently consists of 133 nations plus the Asian giant: China.

Read Complete speech

Tuesday, January 07, 2014

Morales announces allocation of domestic gas to Achacachi

DOMESTIC GAS NETWORKS • In the ceremony at Ayacucho Infantry Regiment in Achacachi , 96 km from the La Paz city, Bolivian president Evo Morales said that the work shall be borne by the state Bolivian oil co..

By EUGEN ROXAS / The Achacachi Post



LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) trucks tanks.. Photo © THE ACHACACHI POST™
ACHACACHI, Bolivia.— According to unofficial sources, between January and October 2013 YPFB installed 75,000 domestic gas connections in different regions of the country.

“I want to tell the people of Achacachi for this year is expected to have gas at home in the city of Achacachi” he said.

” Not by pipeline, but no other way to provide us home gas , we are starting with major and intermediate cities throughout Bolivia, that slowly move forward”, supplemented .

On the other hand, recalled that in 2005, a year before nationalization decreed by the government, oil revenue was 300 million dollars.
“This year it is estimated that oil revenues will be more than 6,000 million dollars, that's our fight, that is the nationalization of our oil” he said.


Thursday, September 05, 2013

Bolivia’s anti-corruption chief charged with extorting airline executive in Miami

CORRUPTION • A high-ranking Bolivian National Police official was sitting in a South Florida jail Thursday on U.S. charges that he tried to extort thousands of dollars from the former owner of a Bolivian airline.

By JAY WEAVER / Miami Herald



Mario Fabricio Ormachea Aliaga. Photo © ENewsTV
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.— The Bolivian government’s top anti-corruption cop is locked up in a downtown jail cell, accused of shaking down a foreign businessman here for $30,000 in exchange for making criminal charges brought against him back home go away.

Bolivian National Police Col. Mario Fabricio Ormachea Aliaga might be stuck in the Miami Federal Detention Center until trial, after the FBI arrested him on a charge of extorting Bolivian businessman Humberto Roca in Miami.

Ormachea, who has a bond hearing Friday, flew from Bolivia to Miami last week to meet with Roca about resolving the charges against the former owner of Aerosur Airlines in his native country. But instead of meeting with the colonel right away, Roca, on the advice of his lawyer, contacted the FBI — leading to his undercover role in a quickie sting operation that ended with Ormachea’s arrest Saturday.

After Roca initially gave Ormachea $5,000 as a down payment toward the alleged extortion demand, the colonel acknowledged meeting with Roca on two occasions, but denied trying to extort him, according to an FBI affidavit filed with a criminal complaint. Ormachea also told FBI agents that he had not traveled to Miami in his official role.

But Roca’s lawyer painted a sinister portrait of Ormachea, saying that he and other senior Bolivian government officials, including President Evo Morales, have orchestrated a campaign of political persecution against his client, who is now seeking asylum in the United States.

“This vindicates him,” attorney Michael Diaz Jr. told the Miami Herald. “We have been saying for quite some time that the Bolivian government has been shaking him down after stripping him of his business. When he wouldn’t play ball with them, he had to seek political asylum for himself and his family in the United States.”
Ormachea’s lawyer, assistant federal public defender Sowmya Bharathi, declined to comment about the charges, and said she will seek to have his bond hearing continued until Sept. 13. Prosecutor John Byrne is seeking the colonel’s detention before trial.


More...

Source: THE MIAMI HERALD®

Monday, September 02, 2013

Bolivian senator's bolt to Brazil sparks diplomatic row

PINTO CASE • Roger Pinto – accused of corruption – escaped across border after spending 452 days at Brazilian embassy in La Paz.

By Jonathan Watts


Bolivian senator Roger Pinto. Photo © ENewsTV
BRAZILIA,
BRAZIL.—
A controversial asylum seeker, a Latin American embassy and a daring escape from the authorities. The ingredients of the diplomatic drama that has just forced the resignation of Brazilian foreign minister Antonio Patriota may sound familiar, even appealing, to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

But the repercussions are now shaking two of South America's staunchest allies. Brazil and Bolivia are at odds over the flight of Roger Pinto, a Bolivian senator who had for 452 days been seeking asylum at the Brazilian embassy in La Paz.

Like Assange at the Ecuadorean embassy in London and Snowden at Moscow airport, the opposition politician was stuck in diplomatic limbo while governments wrangled over his fate.

Although Brazil offered temporary refuge, Bolivia refused safe passage across its borders, saying Pinto had to face accusations of corruption and 13 other criminal charges.

But Pinto escaped this weekend in a 22-hour dash to the border in the car of a sympathetic Brazilian official, who used his diplomatic immunity to protect him.

That diplomat, Eduardo Saboia, said he was moved to take action because Pinto had grown dangerously depressed as a result of his near-15-month confinement in a small room in the embassy.

"I took the decision to conduct this operation, because there was an imminent risk to life and dignity of senator," he told local media.

The intervention has prompted an angry response by Bolivian officials, who accused Brazil of violating international agreements. The Brazilian government claims it had no prior knowledge of the escape, which it described to local media as a "disaster". An inquiry has been launched and heads have started to roll.

More...

Source: THE GUARDIAN®

Monday, June 24, 2013

Obama following 'legal channels' to get Snowden back

SNOWDEN CASE • President Obama said Monday that "we're following all the appropriate legal channels" to return Edward Snowden to the United States from Russia.

By David Jackson / USA TODAY



U.S. officials had worked with Hong Kong since June 10 on a Edward Snowden extradition. Photo © Achacachi Post
WASHINGTON, USA.— Obama said his aides are working with other countries -- which he did not identify -- to make sure "the rule of law" is observed in the Snowden case.

The president, who answered reporters' questions before meeting with business leaders about an immigration bill, declined to comment further.

He spoke shortly after his press secretary, Jay Carney, said that the administration expects Russia to "look at all the options available to them" in order to return Edward Snowden to the United States.

"It is our assumption that he is in Russia," Carney said.

Carney also criticized China and Hong Kong for allowing Snowden to travel to Russia, calling it a "deliberate choice" to "release a fugitive" and saying it will hurt diplomatic relations. More...

Source: USA TODAY®

Wednesday, January 02, 2013

Bolivian officials have been thrown into prison charged with trying to extort Mr. Ostreicher’s assets

BOLIVIAN EXTORTION CASE • Bolivian officials — including prosecutors and the chief legal counselor in the Interior Ministry — have now themselves been thrown into prison, charged with trying to extort Mr. Ostreicher’s assets.

By JOSEPH BERGER


ARRESTED FOR EXTORTION NETWORK. Fernando Rivera Tardio, Isabelino Gomez, Boris Villegas, Janeth Velarde, Denis R. Limachi, Moises Aguilera, Jose M. Antezana, Miguel Gutierrez, Gustavo D Cespedes, Cori Balcazar, Ramiro Ordoñez y Robetro Acha.
This group operated from two ministries. The case of the American Jacob Ostreicher allowed discovering this crime.
Photo and Art © Pagina Siete / The Achacachi Post

SANTA CRUZ, Bolivia .— Jacob Ostreicher was a flooring contractor and father of five from Borough Park, Brooklyn, who, like more than a few entrepreneurs battered by the recession, decided to seek his fortune abroad. In his case, he went into rice farming in Bolivia.

But Mr. Ostreicher’s venture has landed him in what, by his account, is a nightmare that has included 18 months in a notorious Bolivian prison and a lengthy battle with corrupt Bolivian prosecutors bent on stealing his business.

His arrest has turned into an international affair that has drawn in the State Department and the actor-director Sean Penn, who traveled to Bolivia to make a public appeal for Mr. Ostreicher’s release from prison in December.

Mr. Penn’s lobbying appeared to persuade the Bolivian authorities to relent, at least partly. Mr. Ostreicher was allowed out of prison on bail, but he remains under house arrest in Bolivia.

At the same time, more than a dozen Bolivian officials — including prosecutors and the chief legal counselor in the Interior Ministry — have now themselves been thrown into prison, charged with trying to extort Mr. Ostreicher’s assets.

In a telephone interview from his home in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, Mr. Ostreicher, 54, professed his innocence and criticized Bolivian and American authorities. His voice was often weak from the effects of a lengthy hunger strike during which he lost 70 pounds. More...

Source: THE NEW YORK TIMES®

Tuesday, November 06, 2012

Picture of young woman from religious community in Bolivia wins an award

PHOTO AWARD • A photograph of a woman who was, for religious reasons, a reluctant sitter has been named winner of one of the UK's most prestigious portrait prizes.

By MARK BROWN


Margarita Teichroeb meets the camera's gaze. Photo © Jordi Ruiz Cirera/National Portrait Gallery®. See also Lisa Wiltse's Mennonites of Manitoba (81 images)

SANTA CRUZ, Bolivia .— The London-based Spanish photographer Jordi Ruiz Cirera won the £12,000 Taylor Wessing photographic portrait prize for his image of a 26-year-old Bolivian woman called Margarita Teichroeb.

Her shyness stems from the fact she is a Mennonite. The religious community generally forbids images, with some members believing photographs are a form of graven image. "Her awkward expression says a lot about the tradition, isolation and lifestyle of this community," said Ruiz Cirera.

More than 50,000 Mennonites live in Bolivia, descendants of Christian Anabaptists who left Germany in the 16th century. They live humble, reclusive lives, without cars or electricity, and speak Plautdietsch, or Mennonite Low German.
More...

Source: THE GUARDIAN®

Saturday, June 09, 2012

Jindal Bolivia terminates contract of exploitation of iron ore and expects a response in 31 days

RESCISSION • The mining company's decision now leaves the government with the last word. The six years he spent in the country threw more hope than reality.

By EEUGEN ROXAS


Jindal Steel and Power Limited decides to leave the country. Submitted a letter of termination of contract in Bolivia.. Photo © EPA®

LA PAZ, Bolivia .— The Indian firm Jindal abandons the development of iron ore and other minerals at the border between Bolivia and Brazil. This is billed as the largest mining project of President Evo Morales.

A final attempt by the company aimed to invite the Bolivian Minister of Mines to travel to the headquarters of the Indian company, but met with refusal of the authority, which was understood as a closing position of the last opportunity for dialogue.

Jindal Steel & Power Limited (JSPL) sent a letter to rescind his contract. Bolivian Mining Secretary, Mario Virreira, told local media that has the letter and he will give an answer next week.

Jindal Bolivia said that their investments exceeds 600 million dollars and claims that Bolivian Government for not giving land to operate. Another claim of Jindal was gas provision for the steel complex.

The iron deposit "The Mutún" has 40,000 million tons of minerals. Jindal signed in 2007 to operate in half and mount a steel complex in the region. Source: EL DEBER® / EL DIARIO®

Thursday, May 03, 2012

Bolivia nationalises Spanish-owned power grid

NATIONALIZATION • Bolivian troops occupy installations owned by Red Eléctrica, following Argentina's move to nationalise oil company.

By PHILLIP INMAN / The Guardian


Bolivian president Evo Morales (second from the right) and members of his government celebrate May Day. Photo © EPA®

LA PAZ, Bolivia .— The trend for South American nations to reclaim privatised energy businesses has strengthened after Bolivia's president Evo Morales said he planned to seize control of the main power grid from a Spanish-owned company.

The move is a blow to Red Eléctrica Corporaciión, which has operated most of Bolivia's electricity distribution since the grid was privatised 15 years ago.

It follows Argentina's controversial move last month to take control of the country's oil company, YPF, from the Spanish energy company Repsol, which had a majority interest.

Spain's ambassador to La Paz expressed alarm that another overseas Spanish asset was effectively being seized. He said the electric grid takeover "is sending a negative message that generates distrust".

Morales chose to press ahead with the move on May Day, the international labour day, by ordering troops to occupy the company's installations. More...

Source: THE GUARDIAN®

Saturday, April 07, 2012

Bolivian Road Administrator reports that all roads in the country are passable for travelers

ROADS • Disaster prevention official of Bolivian Road Administrator (ABC in Spanish), Cinthia Prado, advised drivers to guide with caution and respect the road signs that are on the roads.

By ANGEL GUARACHI / La Razon

BOLIVIAN ROAD ADMINISTRATOR CINTHIA PRADO
Bolivian Road Administrator (ABC in Spanish for Administradora Boliviana de Caminos), Cinthia Prado. Photo © ABC®

LA PAZ, Bolivia .— The Bolivian Road Administrator (ABC) reported that all the country's roads are passable.

This is to allow people to make trips during the holiday for Easter.

This was announced by the disaster prevention specialist at ABC, Cinthia Prado, in a report by Radio Fides.

However, the pathways to Achacachi should go with caution because the rains are still continuing, according to a report by ABC's.

The specialist asked drivers to be cautious, especially those who travel to the Shrine of Our Lady of Copacabana, because there are pilgrims going on foot.

"It is recommended to respect speed limits, (...) is quite risky to exceed the limits and asks that you please respect the vertical and horizontal signaling that we have established," said the official of the ABC.

Source: LA RAZON®

Friday, March 30, 2012

Bolivia has transformed itself by ignoring the Washington Consensus

DEVELOPMENT • By breaking with orthodox prescriptions for progress, Evo Morales has helped to forge a new Bolivia centred on 'living well'.

By LUIS HERNÁNDEZ NAVARRO / The Guardian


Bolivia's President Evo Morales 'did the opposite of what the Washington Consensus recommends'. Photo © Gaston Brito/Reuters®

LA PAZ, Bolivia .— Gabriela Oviedo is a fashion model and TV personality. She is a 28-year-old brunette, almost six feet tall. Born in the Bolivian province of Santa Cruz, she was elected as the national beauty queen in 2003. In 2004, Gabriela took part in the Miss Universe pageant. There she was asked to name one of the biggest misconceptions about her country. In awkward English, she answered:

"Um … unfortunately, people that don't know Bolivia very much think that we are all just Indian people from the west side of the country. It's La Paz, all the image that we reflect, is that poor people and very short people and Indian people ... I'm from the other side of the country, the east side, and it's not cold, it's very hot and we are tall and we are white people and we know English."
Gabriela's answer, heavy with racism, raised such a wave of outrage in her country that she was forced to give up the contest. Two in every three Bolivians are indigenous people. Her answer, however, was not an isolated occurrence. It reflects the persistence of a white, deeply anti-indigenous Bolivia, which survives today even though deep changes have been introduced, including the approval of anti-racist legislation.


UNITEL Gabriela Oviedo | Presentadora de noticias. Photo © Gaston Brito/Reuters®
In spite of the force of racial discrimination, on 22 January 2006, the Aymara Indian and cocalero unionist Evo Morales was elected president. Since then, the Bolivian state and society have undergone a profound transformation. The country has been decolonised. Indigenous people hold key cabinet positions in government and also in political institutions, while their standard and quality of life have been notably improved. More...

Source: THE GUARDIAN®

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Evo says he will go to Vienna to defend coca leaves chewing

COCA LEAVES CHEWING • President Evo Morales announced that he will travel to Vienna in March to defend the traditional use of coca as coca leaves chewing and urged coca growing peasants to organize themselves to accompany to him to the event in Austria.

By EUGEN ROXAS


Bolivian traditional coca leaves chewing. Photo © CocaGrowers.com®

LA PAZ, Bolivia (TAP).— Mr. Morales made the announcement in his first radio program in Coca Kausachun broadcast station in the Tropical zone of Cochabamba.

Presidente Morales said:

"We're socializing the legalizing of coca leaves chewing" .
On March 12 will be a meeting in Vienna: the Commission on Narcotic Drugs of the United Nations (UN) will congregate to evaluate the strategies in the global fight against drugs.

The President asked his "buddies" that become organized. He said:

"In the past we were alone, the Government was on his side, we were on our side".

"Now we go together: President and leaders".

In years past, and as president of Bolivia, Morales traveled to Vienna and chewed coca leaves (akulliku tradition) in that meeting. Then his Government in June 2011 announced the grievance of the country to the Convention none its withdrawal.

Foreign Minister David Choquehuanca said that "at no time" Vienna Convention was abandoned, but questioned the Convention on Narcotic Drugs of 1961, when it declared "akulliku" (coca leaves chewing) illegal.

Chewing coca leaves or akulliku


Eugen Roxas chewing coca leaves. Photo © THE ACHACACHI POST®

Chewing of coca leaves is the traditional way of enjoy the juice of them. This has been done so by natives of South America for millenia.

Simply pick the leaves and let them dry. Do not eat them. Doing that when they are still fresh is not tasty at all, it tastes very 'green'. After approximately three days the leaves will have dried and become crispy but still remain flexible.

You can, also, buy them ready to chew.

Fold four to ten leaves without breaking them. Now simply put in your mouth. First put the package between the inside of your cheek and teeth and let saliva soak into the leaves. Once they have softened up you can chew--not really chew just suck-- until it becomes a fine pulp. Do not eat this fine pulp, spit it.

You will notice that your gums will go slightly numb and THE EFFECTS of the plant will start to manifest itself: no hungry neither tired and feel more stronger for hours. If you are climbing there will not be any headache.

One way of making your leaves even more potent and fast acting is by adding a small amount of Sodium bicarbonate (a.k.a. cleansing salt or baking soda; it can be bought in almost any supermarket or drugstore). Or you can buy "llujta" together with the coca leaves. It is bought in coca markets. It is a small black ring of bicarbonate.


Coca leaf market. Photo © THE ACHACACHI POST®

That way you will achieve the desired effects faster and more intensly. Because of the Sodium bicarb you will notice a slightly salty taste and the Sodium bicarb will also cause a slight fizzing effect. Just keep on chewing 'cause this is exactly what you whish to achieve. Once again you may swallow or spit out the pulp once you have finished chewing.

Source: The Achacachi Post®

Thursday, February 16, 2012

Sean Penn in Bolivia on humanitarian mission for Haiti

VISIT • Actor Sean Penn arrived in La Paz, Bolivia Wednesday on a humanitarian aid mission for Haiti. President Evo Morales and Penn held a joint news conference to inform members of the media as to what the visit was all about.

By REUTERS /AP /THE HUFFINGTON POST


Morales and Penn in Murillo's Palace. Photo © THE HUFFINGTON POST®

LA PAZ, Bolivia (Reuters).— The Hollywood actor, screenwriter and director is known for his political activism and stopped in the South American country as part of a tour to discuss his work in Haiti where he founded the J/P Haitian Relief Organization in response to the January 2010 earthquake that devastated the Caribbean nation.

"President Morales has received us," said Penn. "We briefly chatted before beginning a discussion about what ways new collaborations might be had with Haiti and Bolivia and we hope to have this be the beginning of many to follow."
President Morales said:
"In the last meeting of the presidents of the ALBA (Bolivarian Alliance of the Americas) we decided that our ministers are going to have a meeting, a meeting in Haiti, to plan and organize how to start the work again with the Haitian people"

Actor Sean Penn in Bolivian traditional dress. Photo © THE HUFFINGTON POST®
US actor Sean Penn has been pictured wearing traditional Bolivian traditional dress during his tour of South America, where he has been speaking out against British "colonialism" of the Falkland Islands.

The Hollywood star wore the garb and a miner's hat during a meeting with Bolivia's president Evo Morales at the presidential palace in La Paz.

Earlier this week Penn made headlines when he attacked Britain's decision to deploy Prince William to the region as a search and rescue pilot.

"The world today cannot tolerate ridiculous demonstrations of colonialism. The way of dialogue is the only way to achieve a better solution for both nations," he said on Monday.

He was branded an "idiot" and a "fool" by Simon Weston, a British veteran of the Falklands war for wading into the dispute.

Penn made the comments as he toured South America in his role as Haitian ambassador-at-large. See more pictures...

Source: Reuters / AP / THE HUFFINGTON POST®

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Urban population boom threatens Lake Titicaca

ENVIRONMENT POLLUTION • Locals, environmentalists and politicians say the waters are becoming increasingly contaminated by waste from cities.

By SARA SHAHRIARI / The Guardian

MAPS AND PICTURES

LA PAZ, Bolivia .— South America's most famous lake is being polluted by increasing levels of waste from fast-growing cities, according to locals, environmentalists and politicians.

Lake Titicaca, which sits on the border of Bolivia and Peru, has sustained agricultural societies on the dry, high-altitude Andean plains for thousands of years, but is now threatened by a population boom from nearby cities and towns.

El Alto has grown at 4% a year for two decades as rural peasants seek a better life, and is now the country's second largest city and the largest urban centre in the Titicaca watershed.

But this migration has had devastating effects on the rivers of El Alto, communities downstream and Lake Titicaca. Raw sewage, garbage and industrial waste are all dumped into the Seco River, which flows through the heart of El Alto. At the edge of the city, where the Seco begins a 40-mile journey toward Lake Titicaca, it also receives treated wastewater from the city's severely overtaxed treatment plant. Those waters mix and travel out over the flat plains. More...

Source: THE GUARDIAN®

Friday, January 06, 2012

Towards a smarter drugs policy

DRUGS DEBATE • US drugs debate is dominated by a Manichean divide between prohibitionists and liberalisers, obscuring real scientific solutions.

By KEITH HUMPHREYS and JONATHAN CAULKINS / The Guardian


Packages containing marijuana in Tijuana, Mexico, after a seizure by police. Photo © REUTERS®

UNITED STATES, USA .— The loudest voices in US drug policy debates call either for enforcing prohibition with ever-increasing ferocity or for giving up altogether by letting corporations legally sell the currently illicit drugs much as they do tobacco and alcohol. But as our colleagues and we detail this week in the Lancet (summary; subscription-only, there is an alternative: adopting drug policies with scientific evidence of effectiveness.

Accumulating research overturns some deeply cherished ideas in drug policy. For example, alternative development (eg, encouraging Colombians to grow flowers or Afghans to grow raisins instead of coca plant and opium poppy, respectively) has never had any documented impact on the price, availability or use of drugs on American streets. If we want to subsidise those foreign industries for their own sake, we should do so – but labeling such efforts as "drug control" programs is deceitful. More...

Source: THE GUARDIAN®

THE ACHACACHI POST